SquarePatch

Serving San Diego
Since 2007

Re-imagine

Your Workplace
A Holistic Approach to

Workforce Development

We`re SquarePatch

WE CARE.

We are trained to provide spiritual and emotional care for moments where life surprises us. We have partnered with clients support them through grief and loss, hospital visitation, or short term counseling.

WE COACH.

Roadblocks are part of the process. We coach employees with skills needed to address obstacles in order to achieve their goals. We have assisted some clients discern next steps in their career or life decisions.

WE CONSULT.

At times, a client may want to re-envision their culture, values, and leadership practices. We partner with leaders to create spaces of safety to explore new possibilities.

ABOUT US

We believe the workplace deserves purpose, meaning, and joy by nurturing a humanizing environment through care, coaching, and counseling.

We imagine a workplace where you derive purpose, meaning, and joy. We provide care that fosters personal and professional growth. It’s no longer just about work. It’s about why and how we work. It’s about creating a culture of thriving and safety to achieve the goals we dream about, both in the workplace and in life.

Spiritual & Emotional Counseling
100%
Coaching
100%
Consulting
100%

Our Team

Roy Inzunza

Roy Inzunza

Executive Director, Staff and Leadership Care Consultant

“Top 3 favorite podcasts/books:
the wounded healer, the advantage, Gymlet startup podcast

What is the one thing about your job that you are really passionate about? Listening and asking questions that help people have deeper understanding of themselves and their current circumstance.

What are your credentials/past experience that have equipped you to be a corporate chaplain? Masters in chaplaincy and pastoral care and counseling, certified spiritual director, currently working on a doctorate.

Kindra Green Carson

Kindra Green Carson

Staff and Leadership Care Consultant

Top 3 favorite podcasts/books:
On Being Podcast, Tattoos on the Heart (Gregory Boyle), Awed to Heaven, Rooted to Earth (Walter Brueggemann)

What is the one thing about your job that you are really passionate about? Fiercely insisting that no person suffers alone. Traveling with others as they journey towards wholeness.

What are your credentials/past experience that have equipped you to be a corporate chaplain? I studied Bible and Theology for my Bachelors, Divinity for my Masters, and Doctorate in Leadership. I have been working in ministry for over 20 years.

Rafee Jajou

Rafee Jajou

Staff and Leadership Care Consultant

Top 3 favorite podcasts/books/tv/movies:

Podcasts: Improv 4 Humans, Today: Explained, Homilies by Fr. Richard Rohr
Books: Lord of the Rings, The Shack, The Tale of Desperaux
TV: The Office, DareDevil, The Daily Show, Madam Secretary

What is the one thing about your job that you are really passionate about?
Perhaps this relates to a problem that you feel you can fix given your special skill-set (one sentence): I love meeting one-one or leading a workshop to help someone discover a core issue and action steps for their home or work life.

What are your credentials/past experience that have equipped you to be a corporate chaplain?
Over 15 years of public speaking, organizational leadership, and one-one coaching to individuals, companies, and non-profits. Over 600 hours of certified hospital chaplain work supporting diverse patients and their families during illness or death. Certified Leadership Coach.

"The workplace is more than a place or organization that provides a paycheck or products/services. The workplace is a training ground for our lives – where we discover who we are and a part of our place in the world."

Rafee Jajou

Services

Consulting

Consulting

We enable companies to re-envision their culture, values, and leadership practices.

Coaching

Coaching

We coach employees with skills to overcome obstacles.

Care

Care

We provide spiritual and emotional care.

From the Blog

The Harvard Negotiation Project

Aug 24, 2021

You’re an executive in a company that is undergoing changes.  New products and services are on the line.  Your team has worked hard on creating a new service that you believe will have a big impact on the clients and your bottom line.  But another team in a different division is not so excited about the changes and is pushing back.  As an executive, it’s a moment in your leadership abilities to resolve the pushback and conflict that is ensuing.  

You’re an accounting clerk and have been working at the same company for 12 years.  Your department has undergone some changes.  You’re not too happy with them.  The manager seems to care and understands something needs to change in order to make the department run smoother.  The culture and morale feel heavy and some team members have quit.  You are fighting the temptation to quit but also don’t know how to have a conversation with management about the issues you see.  

Your son wants to go out on a weeknight and it’s a homework heavy week.  He makes his case that he will work hard to turn in his assignments on time and that he will be back home before curfew.  But you know that it might be tough for him to finish his AP chem homework and go to the movies that night.  You also know it’s going to take him longer to get and it will pass his curfew.  He’s been struggling as all teens do and you feel like it might be good for his morale if he goes but you’re unsure.

—-

Our personal and professional lives are fraught with small and large conflicts.  Some are very easy to work through.  Others seem to cause anger, frustration, and like the world around you is falling apart.  

The executive might be inwardly angry but doesn’t show it.  The clerk has expressed frustration but now feels demoralized that nothing is changing.  The parent has work conflicts to deal with and now also has to deal with the teenage son.

Developing and strengthening our ability to self-regulate and focus on the issue with some clarity is a major key when working through conflicts.  Some wisdom traditions call it peace-making.  I personally struggle with calling it conflict resolution because it seems like such a corporate fad these days.  But conflict is very real and if not handled well, it can impact morale and money.  

Rabbi Jonathan Sacks shares a story from his faith tradition about working through conflicts.  He’s a great writer whose work with the British empire gave him a perspective that included working with  politicians, corporate executives, and armed services leaders.  

What he found in his faith tradition stories when working through conflict was revealing:  he saw parallels with 3500 year old stories and Harvard’s Negotiation Project guidelines!  

Here is a primer on the guidelines:

Sacks, Jonathan. Lessons in Leadership

My only addition to this negotiation conflict skill is the inner work of self-regulation.  For example, doing deep breathing for me when I am angry over a conflict has helped to slow down my emotional process so that I can think through the guidelines prescribed.  Slowing down my emotional cycle helps me to de-escalate the situation within me so I can be a peacemaker.

yellow white and gray background

Leadership: Alignment

We couldn’t agree more with this view of leadership:

Organizations need people for their energy, effort, and talent. Individuals need organizations for the many rewards they offer. But the needs of the individual and the organization don’t always line up very well. When the fit between people and organizations is poor, one or both suffer. Individuals may feel underpaid, unappreciated, or disrespected. Organizations sputter because individuals give less than their best or work against organizational purposes. Douglas McGregor argued some fifty years ago that the central task of leadership is to ensure alignment between people and organizations so that individuals find satisfying, meaningful work, and organizations get the talent and energy they need to succeed.

Bolman, Lee G.; Deal, Terrence E.. How Great Leaders Think

While there are structural and strategic forms of leadership, organizations need people to execute their tasks with precision. Our team has seen it time and again when an organization isn’t tight and right on their care for employees. Higher turnover. Low morale. Infighting. Lack of motivation.

Harmony is what we long for in our corporate structures. Harmony of purpose, values, meaning, and care of the people.

One way to accomplish this is by doing exercises to reflect on what’s working and what needs improvement. Get your team involved and empower them to be honest. It’s humbling (humiliating sometimes) but very meaningful. Remember that it’s helping us get to the results we’re hoping for!

aerial view and grayscale photography of high rise buildings

Leadership Learnings: Mission, Resistance, Slow Change

Mission

A healthy leader (healthy: self-aware, humble, competent, caring) is constantly thinking about the organizations mission. Mission first above all else. Mission helps shape decisions, values, practices, and culture.

What’s the goal? Purpose? What are we trying to accomplish? All mission driven questions.

Resistance

Sticking to your core mission will, without a doubt, cause resistance within you (as the leader) and the organization. Organisms like stability. They learn to stabilize over a period of time for balance and steadiness. Biologists call this homeostasis. So when the leader is focused on a mission and it requires making changes, the system will naturally resist. It’s normal. Expect it. Prepare for it.

Slow Changes from the Margins

Tod Bolsinger (author of Canoeing the Mountains) talks about a process of observing, interpreting, and interventions as a means to come up with new innovations that meet the new needs. They’re initially experiments in the margins that won’t rock the boat too quickly. But it will rock it.

Peter Senge says:

“The key to their survival was the ability to run ‘experiments in the margin,’ to continually explore new business and organizational opportunities that create potential new sources of growth.”

Peter Senge

There are so many changes caused by tech, climate change, customer needs. A leader will be more prepared as they’re learning perennial leadership wisdom to face the changing tides.

NOTE: One of my new favorite definitions on leadership….

“enabling a [team, company) to grow so they can face their greatest challenges and thrive

Bolsinger, Tod E. . Canoeing the Mountains

Bolsinger offers us wisdom for when the resistance comes and we’re trying to strategize:

  • Start with conviction
  • stay calm
  • stay connected
  • stay the course.

SquarePatch’s mission is driven by purpose, meaning, and joy in the marketplace through our services of leadership, employee, and organizational care. It’s a holistic approach of engaging and equipping leaders and employees to face challenges and thrive!

Promoting Systemic Health

Currently working through #CanoeningtheMountains, by #todbolsinger

A healthy system is working through its shared values translated in behaviors. Leaders set a tone in the system!

It’s been so good!!!

“Like healthy people, systems promote their health through “responsible and enlightened behavior.” The people who are most in position to enhance the health of a system are precisely those who have been empowered to be responsible, namely the leaders. . . . They set a tone, invite collaboration, make decisions, map a direction, establish boundaries, encourage self-expression, restrain what threatens the integrity of the whole, and keep the system’s direction aligned with purposes.”

Tod Bolsinger, Canoening the Mountains

How To Set Goals: 3 Practices for Leaders

SUMMARY:  (5 min read) Our team has created three strategic objectives for 2021 to support your workplace. The following article is about a leadership practice for how to set goals based on our observations.

—–

I am going to say something hard…so get ready. 

Buckle up. 

If we want to talk about productivity on our teams and about excelling and even exceeding what we have done in the past…then we have to talk, first and foremost, about…you. 

It is tempting and can even be addicting to talk about our teams or people as the loci for the challenges and setbacks we have. But, as Ron Heifetz and Marty Linsky put it, “when you belong to the organization or community that you are trying to lead, you are part of the problem.” Leadership on the Line, (p. 90). 

OUCH. And, this is deeply good news—because if you are part of the problem then you are also part of the answer. 

As leaders we would love to keep people accountable until all problems melt away and there is ease at work. But all too often we are reluctant to see ourselves on the playing field and acknowledge that we are not only members of the team but also contributors to the problem. If you want accountable teams the bucks starts, and stops, with you. 

We must first get accountable with ourselves, secondly, model it, and finally encourage/enact it. 

Getting Accountable with Ourselves 

In Dr. Cloud’s work he makes a pretty radical and profound statement about leaders, “You are ridiculously in charge.” Boundaries for Leaders, (p. 15).

 So, think about what your greatest concern or challenge is in your department…and then ask this hard but important question:        

How am I contributing to this? 

If you are willing to ask this question of yourself, and then of members of your team, you will begin where all leaders need to, with yourself. 

Try saying something like this: 

“I noticed that our communication could be stronger, can you tell me ways that I communicate that team members may think is weak and what you would do differently to make it stronger? 

Then, just listen. 

Don’t argue or make excuses. 

Take notes. 

And then, as quickly as possible, put that feedback into practice. 

Model it

Once you have taken the step to practice “Getting Accountable,” you have developed a real strength in your leadership. Model it well. 

One simple but effective way to do this well is to narrate it. This is a powerful tool for helping people hear the new story you are telling, or new culture you are creating, with your team and your business. Don’t assume they are just picking it up. Narrate it. It could like this: 

Let’s break this down.  Notice these 7 elements to Narrating Accountable Change:

  1. State your intentions
  2. Action Taken
  3. Ownership
  4. Clarify
  5. Intention
  6. Their Responsibility 
  7. Gratitude 

(Find a helpful worksheet here)

Encourage/Enact it 

Are people refusing to communicate? What are you/have you done to fix the miscommunication? You must address it promptly and hold them to the change. How do you communicate effectively with your people? Are you modeling good behavior? If so, then you can ask the team to rise to this occasion. Are you stopping poor behavior? If a team member continues to communicate ineffectively you must take action for their sake and for the sake of the team. 

Cloud points out that, as the leader, you create the memory from which your team operates. 

Looking at this example around communication, think about it this way:

 If you communicate well, you tell them:

  1. What is allowed, and 
  2. What is not allowed,  if you refuse to allow poor communication from yourself or between others. 
  3. This creates Memory. They have experienced you communicating effectively and experienced you supporting anyone whose communication is not strong to strengthen it so, they can relax and do the work, we call this productivity.

It then becomes simple/memory for your team to see your actions and follow your lead. It also becomes simple/memory for you to illustrate that you live out the same expectations you have for them—so you expect nothing more and you will not tolerate anything less. 

We look forward to having more coaching conversations with leaders this year that lead to accountability and productivity. 


SquarePatch Objectives 2021

This year, our chaplaincy team has three strategic objectives birthed from what we observe in the workplace during the pandemic:

  1. Coaching conversations with leaders that lead to practices that directly impact their leadership and performance.
  2. Create practices that help workers and the workplace have more purpose, meaning, and joy.
  3. Deepen the quality of our care with employees that directly impacts their personhood and performance.

These objectives came out of a time of observing and listening to the losses and longings employees and leaders have shared with us.  They will function as a means to see transformation in lives as well as the workplace.  We want to impact both the person and their performance at work, believing that the personal and professional are somehow tied together.

Under each objective, we’ve outlined some actionable items and themes we’d like to focus on with leaders…again based on what we observe and hear from the worker and and the workplace system.  

We believe the workplace deserves purpose, meaning, and joy by nurturing a humanizing environment through care, coaching, and counseling.

Come and Work with Us

Contact Info